MS Mondays: Week of August 6th

You can’t turn on the TV this week without hearing something about the Olympics. It’s fascinating to watch, too. The way the gymnasts can flip and spin on the uneven bars is amazing, and the divers who can perform in-air twists and turns and manage to hit the water precisely when they need to are awe inspiring. All the Olympians are amazing talented, but what’s even more amazing is that there’s one athlete competing who doesn’t have legs!

If you’ve turned on the news in the past day, I’m sure you’d heard the name Oscar Pistorius. He’s the runner from South Africa who uses prosthetic running blades. And while he didn’t qualify for the finals, he did leave a lasting mark on the world by defying the odds to make it all the way to the Olympics. He proved that just because you have a disability, doesn’t mean you can’t achieve greatness.

I’m not trying to compare someone’s birth defect to a disease like MS, but if a man whose legs were amputated as a baby can make it all the way to the Olympics, what can you accomplish?

If you need some motivation, check out these awesome people (all of whom have MS!):

1. A German man, who can only walk 100 meters (328 feet) at a time, climbed a “via ferrata” in Austria. A quick google search showed me that a via ferrata is a mountain with cables and ladders and looks something like this:

And that’s an “easy” level.

(Source)

Maybe, this is your kind of thrill. But for me, that looks extremely terrifying. How about we focus on someone who isn’t into something so extreme?

MS affects each person differently.

MS affects each person differently.

 2. You may remember Lauren Parrott from this MS Mondays post about awesome people, but did you also know she’s a TV Producer? How cool is that? Lauren, who started having MS symptom when she was 16, has wanted to be in television her whole life, according to an interview with  Grosse Point Today.  To read the full interview, visit: http://grossepointetoday.com/people/ben-burns/003000-tv-producer-doesnt-let-chronic-disease-hold-her-back)

3. Adam Riedy wanted to play hockey as a kid but his mother wanted him to do something else. He chose speed skating. He became so good at speed skating that he tried out for the 2002 Olympics. However, at the same time he was diagnosed with MS, at the age of 19, and didn’t make it to the Olympics. He has retired from skating but not from being active. On August 4-5, he participated in the Pedal to the Point MS ride from Brunswick, Ohio to Sandusky, Ohio – a 60+ mile ride! (Source)

While these people aren’t Olympians, they are pretty amazing, and so are you! If you feel like you can’t do anything because of MS, just remember these people, and know that there’s something amazing you can do as well!

Need some more motivation, here’s your MS Monday Motivational Moment!

About the Author: Lindsey Beacham, from Atlanta, serves as Marketing Coordinator for UroMed. She graduated from Auburn University with a B.A. in Criminology and from Georgia State University with a B.B.A in Marketing. When she’s not busy with marketing or studying for additional degrees, she enjoys cooking, reading, and spending time with her family.

About UroMed Catheters
Headquartered in Suwanee, GA [a suburb of Atlanta], UroMed is one of the nation’s leading providers of single-use catheters, urological and disposable medical supplies, including intermittent catheters, closed system catheters, condom catheters, pediatric catheters and continence care products. UroMed is nationally accredited for Medicare reimbursement and most state Medicaid plans, and partners with private health insurance providers and health plans to provide patients with single-use catheters, catheter kits and incontinence products. UroMed also has seven staffed regional offices located in Boston, MA; Columbia, SC; Jacksonville, FL; Dallas, TX; Carlsbad, CA; Knoxville, TN; Richmond, VA; and Baton Rouge, LA; enabling next-day delivery after a customer’s initial medical supply order. For more information, please visit http://www.uromed.com or call 1-800-841-1233.

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