Athlete Todd Robinson Learns How to Get Over Being Mad and Disappointed

Editor’s Note: Life’s not fair. The good guys don’t always win, and every athlete doesn’t win a gold medal. Many ask why compete if you can’t win?  The answer, according to Todd Robinson of Alpharetta, Georgia, and a sales representative for At Home Medical, is always to improve. Part 2 of a four-part series.

Todd and his wife Melissa love getting out to enjoy life on the Alabama coast!

Todd and his wife Melissa love getting out to enjoy life on the Alabama coast!

Question: Todd, how did you get over being mad and disappointed after you realized that you’d see the world from a wheelchair?

Robinson: Sports, athletics and good friends who supported me helped me tremendously, but getting involved in wheelchair basketball after I got out of rehab helped me the most. I was still in school at the time and spent part of my time in rehab.

My home-school teacher helped keep me up to date on my school courses, so I wouldn’t be behind my classmates when I returned to school. I was able to take my finals in ninth grade with the rest of my class. My recreational therapist, Milton Courington, played on a basketball team and got me involved in wheelchair basketball.

Todd attributes his ability to move on to being involved in Wheelchair Basketball.

Todd attributes his ability to move on to being involved in Wheelchair Basketball.

I really enjoyed wheelchair basketball, because it was the closest to the football I’d played before my accident. Back then, they didn’t have the rules they have now in wheelchair basketball. When I started playing, it was a full-contact sport, and knocking-down your opponents was allowed. The officials finally cleaned-up the game. But when I played, it was rough, tough and really fun.

I stayed involved in wheelchair basketball for 13 years, but I had to quit playing basketball when I moved to Georgia, because there wasn’t a team near the psychiatric hospital where I worked.

Question: What did you do at the psychiatric hospital?

Robinson: I taught recreational therapy. I received a college degree in recreational therapy from the University of South Alabama.

Counseling challenged kids only challenged Todd to excel more, leading through example in his athletic pursuits.

Counseling challenged kids only challenged Todd to excel more, leading through example in his athletic pursuits.

Question: What was studying recreational therapy like in college, where the rest of your class had athletic abilities and the use of their entire bodies, whereas you were in a wheelchair?

Robinson: I enjoyed it. There weren’t many people in the school in chairs like me. Some of the classes were a challenge, but my teachers worked with me and helped me to adapt to the program. Everyone in college thought that I should probably major in computers, because I was in a wheelchair, and truth be told, I probably should have majored in computer science. But I wasn’t interested in computers. I met the lady in charge of the recreational department, and when I went to the class, I enrolled in recreational therapy and loved it.

Question: How did you go from studying recreational therapy to teaching it in a psychiatric hospital?

Robinson: I really wanted to teach recreational therapy to people in wheelchairs, but those jobs were few and hard to get. I also had a degree in business management as a back up plan, so I was able to transfer my skills into another area.

Question: What was your experience at the psychiatric hospital like?

Robinson: I was really out of my element. I had a psychiatric rotation in college, but I never considered working in recreational therapy with psychiatric patients. But I learned to like it. I learned a lot from the staff members and the patients, as well as the young people with whom I worked. We taught young people how to make better decisions and how to cope with their problems. I was primarily responsible for the ropes’ course.

Next: Up in the Air in a Wheelchair with Athlete Todd Robinson

About the Author: For the last 12 years, John E. Phillips of Vestavia, Alabama, has been a professional blogger for major companies, corporations and tourism associations throughout the nation. During his 24 years as Outdoor Editor for “The Birmingham Post-Herald” newspaper, he published more than 7,000 newspaper columns and sold more than 100,000 of his photos to newspapers, magazines and internet sites. He also hosted a radio show that was syndicated at 27 radio stations; created, wrote and sold a syndicated newspaper column that ran in 38 newspapers for more than a decade; and wrote and sold more than 30 books. Learn more at http://www.nighthawkpublications.com

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Headquartered in Suwanee, GA [a suburb of Atlanta], UroMed is one of the nation’s leading providers of single-use catheters, urological and disposable medical supplies, including intermittent catheters, closed system catheters, condom catheters, pediatric catheters and continence care products. UroMed is nationally accredited for Medicare reimbursement and most state Medicaid plans, and partners with private health insurance providers and health plans to provide patients with single-use catheters, catheter kits and incontinence products. UroMed also has seven staffed regional offices located in Boston, MA; Columbia, SC; Jacksonville, FL; Dallas, TX; Carlsbad, CA; Knoxville, TN; Richmond, VA; and Baton Rouge, LA; enabling next-day delivery after a customer’s initial medical supply order. For more information, please visit http://www.uromed.com or call 1-800-841-1233.

2 Responses to Athlete Todd Robinson Learns How to Get Over Being Mad and Disappointed

  1. Pingback: Athlete Todd Robinson Prepares for the 2011 RedMan Ironman Triathlon « UroMed Catheter Health Blog

  2. Pingback: Athlete Todd Robinson Prepares for the 2011 RedMan Ironman Triathlon

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